Tag Archives: #plantarfasciitis

Lateral Movement Training: A Path to Stronger Hips, Knees, Ankles, Feet and Core

Side Step to Skip, Stop, Short Foot Activation, Single Leg Balance = Strength, Stability & Success

We started to really implement this & then fine tune it in response to a handful of athletes (from weekend warriors & runners to our high school athletes; especially those that play soccer &/or basketball ), who noted either stiff or weak, unstable ankles, lack of balance, as well as foot pain in the arch & heel commonly referred to as plantar fasciitis & even Achilles’ Tendonosis.

However, this lateral movement is applicable & can be practically applied to virtually everyone’s full body workout, DIY, no equipment necessary (aka one less excuse), Movement Rx.  Also worth noting is the empowering improvement we’ve seen in those determined & dedicated individuals who want to avoid or get out of those muscle atrophy & weakness potentiating orthotics or supports.

It can all start with the explained balancing of the supinators & pronators (neither is inherently “bad,” & both necessary for optimal biomechanics & your best chances at efficient, pain free movement), the hip adductors & abductors, & improving balance, strength & stability from the foot up through the core; feel it, embrace it, & repeat.

Know why you’re doing what you’re doing.
Know what you should be feeling; engaging & activating & experiencing.
Get after it.

Creating Stronger Feet, Knees, Hips & Core: 10 Way Standing Hips

This strengthening and stabilizing technique was spawned out of injured &/or elder patients not being able to get down to the floor and perform a hip strengthening technique: ( https://onebody.live/2020/01/18/8-way-hips-lateral-strength-stability-balance/ ), yet demonstrating a clear need to for hip stabilization. The other thought that drove the creation of this technique was the desire to go beyond simple, tissue specific, isolation exercises/techniques, and look to perform the movements in a more practical position; a functional movement if you will.

Specific strengthening is good and has it’s place no doubt, but if we can piece the isolation exercises together and couple that with being in the relative body position that we will be looking to have the body engage all of these tissues in a synergystic manner, it becomes more of an effective neuro-musculo-skeletal collaborative dance both in practice and through implementation throughout the day.

As stated in another recent post: ( https://onebody.live/2020/02/10/biomechanics-breakdown-short-foot-activation-a-strong-foot-the-basis-for-all-other-movement/ ), it starts with the foot for a variety of reasons, we then continue to activate and engage up the chain, AND THEN go into our additional movements in a more controlled, balanced, and powerful manner; facilitating both efficient and safer movement. When we strip it down and pay attention to details in a repetitive, systematic manner, it more easily translates to our everyday movements with less effort; reprogramming the nervous system and activations patterns necessary to walk, run, jump, lift, MOVE to the best of our ability.